Fall Movie Night Discussion: The Trouble With Harry

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So, I would have called it “September Movie Night” but… we’re halfway through October already. So we’ll just call it “Fall” and leave it at that.

Our fall Comfy Couch Night movie was the Hitchcock comedy, The Trouble With Harry. And the trouble with Harry was that he was, rather inconveniently for all involved, DEAD. So that makes for a lot of hijinks and shenanigans, as they would have said in the 50s.

Now I’m guessing not a lot of you opted to watch this one, but I’ll open the discussion up — because it’s the first “older” movie we’ve watched, and I’m interested what everyone thought of it. Around here, we’re making an effort to check out classic older movies, and we were pleasantly surprised by this one — it was a gem, and we really enjoyed it. But, I’ll leave the rest of my assessment for the discussion (if there is one!)

So leave your comments below, and let us know what you thought!

 

3 thoughts on “Fall Movie Night Discussion: The Trouble With Harry

  1. I guess I’ll go first.

    I did enjoy the fall, and the little village where people were nosy, but in an odd way. They were certainly in each other’s business. But it felt a little…off.

    Maybe that’s Hitchcock?

    Harry’s presence was very inconvenient. His absence was worse. The poor Captain just could not catch a break for the longest time.

    I think my favourite bit was the way our heroes teamed up to clean up Harry, and their handling of the Deputy Sheriff.

  2. Okay, my turn! We really enjoyed it. We didn’t think we would, at first… it started kind of weird. Well, the people were weird. But then, one by one, the weirdness got explained, and things got rolling. Sure, there was still the 50s quirkiness that you see in any film of that period, but definitely… they were ODD.

    I really enjoyed how some of the characters developed. Sam, the brains behind the operation, had some fantastic double entendres, and so many things he said just dripped with sarcasm — we were killing ourselves laughing at conversations between Sam and the Captain and Sam and Arnie. But that’s that era of screenwriting for you — sometimes, the dialogue just crackled with wit.

    I thought the little romance between the Captain and Miss Gravely was sweet. And the way the group handled Harry and the Sheriff in the end was very Hitchcockian — I kept expecting twists and turns that never happened, and didn’t expect the very funny and gentle ones that did.

    My favourite bit: When Sam and the little boy, Arnie, were chatting on the porch.

    “Nice rabbit you have there. What do you call him?”
    “Dead.”

    So, yeah, it wasn’t one of Hitchcock’s classics, but it was fun and a good gentle comedy, and we really enjoyed it.

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